Saturday, February 9, 2013

Black Ice - The Colored Hockey League, Nova Scotia

                       THE CHL

See Black Ice:
The Lost History of the Coloured Hockey League (CHL)

Halifax Eurekas 1906 of the CHL – Coloured Hockey League
With certainty, we can only date Black hockey to the early 1870’s, yet we know that hockey and Black history in Nova Scotia have parallel roots, going back almost 100 years . Among the first reports of hockey being played occur in 1815 along the isolated Northwest Arm, south of Halifax. The date is important for the simple fact that as late as October 1815 the region was not home to a large White settlement but was instead the site of a small Black enclave. Four Black families originally from the Chesapeake Bay area, with a total of fifteen children, had relocated and settled on the Arm. It is reported that these families, Couney, Williams, Munro and Leale, received adequate food, lodging and employment implying that their children were healthy and would have been able to play hockey during the winter months when the Arm was frozen and suitable for skating. Were these children among the first Canadians to play the game of hockey? We do not know. All we can say is that the coincidence between the date of the Northwest Arm’s Black settlement and the first records of hockey being played in the area are worthy of reflection.  (See more)                                                        by George and Darril Fosty                                          

                                                                           Black Nova Scotia Hockey Circa 1910


                                       See also the article     The CHL is Black History

Friday, February 8, 2013

Remember Donald Byrd R.I.P.

Take a musical break and remember Donald Byrd.
Donaldson Toussaint L'Ouverture Byrd II (December 9, 1932 – February 4, 2013) 
Jazz and rhythm and blues trumpeter.

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

Monday, February 4, 2013

Dr. John Henrik Clarke Speaks on Racism

Dr. John Henrik Clarke Origin and Impact of Racism.

 This talk by Dr. Clarke is very appropriate for "Black History Month" because here he addresses the very reason that such an occassion needs to exist at all. There really isn't much I can say other than to suggest that you take the time to listen to this talk, then discuss it with your family and friends. If you want the right answers then ask the right questions. 

February 4 - Rosa Parks Birthday

Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (February 4, 1913 – October 24, 2005) 
was an African-American civil rights activist, whom the U.S. Congress called "the first lady of civil rights", and "the mother of the freedom movement"

Mrs Parks refusal to give up her seat sparked
The reknowned Montgomery Bus Boycott

See Also:

Sunday, February 3, 2013

Africa: States of independence - The Scramble For Africa

Looking For The African Dream

 Colonization was not good for African people. The land was raped, the people slaughtered, exploited and demoralized. Now today, decades after liberation, in what condition do we find the people of Africa? Why? This video series paints a picture of some of the ordeals the people had to contend with as well as the obstacles that the people must still overcome. Watch it and see what you think about the things that went on and where you think it's likely to go. I like the way the state of the African people is presented objectively in this series Africa: States of independence. African people throughout the world can look at this and perhaps gain many useful insights. Keep in mind that this series was created several years ago, (I'm not exactly sure when) so we can watch and gage for ourselves which direction we think things are moving.

Click on the links below to see more of the Africa: States of independence series.